Home    Contact   
Publishing Menubar Book PublishingMagazine PublishingAudiobook PublishingNewsletter PublishingE-Book PublishingeZine PublishingPublishing Menubar

Home
Associations
Authors
Awards
Book Binding
Book Fairs/Festivals
Book History
Canadian
Careers
Censorship
Children's Books
Contracts
Copyright
Design/Illustration
Distribution
Editorial
Education
Genres
Indexing
Libraries
Literary Agents
Marketing/Publicity
People/Profiles
Printing
Publishers
Reviews
Sales/Bookselling
Self-Publishing
Software
Statistics
Translation
Vendors/Services
Writing

RECOMMENDED!






Marketing to Libraries

by Wendy J. Woudstra   

 
 


If you have been ignoring your marketing attempts to libraries, perhaps a look at the twenty myths about marketing to libraries will help you focus on this "solid, unglamorous but dependable market, worth more than $5 billion in material sales." Mark Sexton explains why you don't want to let your wholesaler shoulder all the responsibility to market to this segment, and how you can best promote your books to libraries.

The most important first-step needed to market to libraries must be done before the book is published. You must ensure that you have an International Standard Book Number (ISBN) and the Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication data. To get more information on applying to receive this data, visit the Library of Congress website at http://lcweb.loc.gov.

Because of an increase in the number of self-published books, and the subsequent workload placed on the Library of Congress in creating CIP blocks, the LOC has been reluctant to offer this service to small publishers. If you have been given the cold shoulder by the Library of Congress, your best bet is to get a P-CIP block from Quality Books (1-800-323-4241) which should do the same job.

Another thing to consider when designing your book is that many librarians will consider a book without an index less valuable than one that is indexed. While indexing is a tedious task if you choose to undertake the project yourself, or an added expense if you choose to hire an indexer, you should weigh the disadvantages of indexing against the additional marketing clout the index will offer your book.

You can find more information about indexing at the web site of the American Society of Indexers or its equivalent in England and Ireland, the Society of Indexers.

Librarians pay attention to which books receive positive reviews in industry publications, and base many of their buying decisions on those reviews. It is important not to neglect prepublication review sources such as Choice, Kirkus Reviews, Library Journal, Publishers Weekly and Booklist.

Libraries prefer to buy from wholesalers in order to receive a discount. A fact sheet is available from the Montgomery County, Maryland, Department of Public Libraries web site which includes a brief listing of the library wholesalers libraries prefer, as well as information on direct marketing to libraries.

Library wholesalers expect a large discount, and generally sell your books to libraries at a 40% discount. Keeping this in mind, you may wish to market to libraries directly and cut out the middleman by offering libraries a slightly better discount by ordering directly.

Good luck and happy marketing!


by Wendy Woudstra