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RECOMMENDED!






Format Each eBook Chapter Before you Write It

by Judy Cullins © 2002   

 
 


Do you have a problem creating a focus in your chapters?
Does your writing slip around, leaving a muddy path to the
gold--your unique, useful message?

Most writers start writing before they are sure of their eBook's
main focus or thesis. The thesis is your book's major answer for
a problem your targeted audience has. "Five Ways to Market
Your Book Online" has its thesis built into the title, a definite
plus. You know by the title you'll learn five Online marketing
techniques to overcome your problem of not selling enough
eBooks.

Each chapter should answer a part of your book's thesis. In this
case, you'll have 5 chapters. Let's say one chapter is titled:
"Market your Book Through Free Articles."

In this chapter you need to sketch out what your format will be
before you write a single word. For instance, you may open the
chapter with a
pertinent quote. Second, you may offer a success story to
illustrate how one person's articles brought her new product and
service sales. Third, you will offer a section where you give
numbers of tips or how to's. For instance, "How to Write a
Short Article," or "How to Write A Publishable Article."

Sprinkled throughout your chapter you may put author tips into
boxes. You may choose to do the same for related quotes as
Julia Cameron did in "Artists Way."

Finally, in the last section of your chapter you may give
homework or fieldwork. These act as a chapter review and give
your reader "action steps." Remember, your targeted audience
wants solutions to problems. Your book should show them
how.

Now that you have the format for one non-fiction, how-to
chapter, you need to follow the same format for all the rest of the
chapters.

Format each chapter. Your consistency, your organized, focused
copy will compel your reader to want to read every other
chapter because they are easy to understand.



Judy Cullins: author, publisher, book coach
Helps professionals manifest their book and web dreams
eBook: Ten Non-techie Ways to Market Your Book Online

www.bookcoaching.com/products.shtml

Send an email to Subscribe@bookcoaching.com
FREE The Book Coach Says... includes 2 free eReports
Judy@bookcoaching.com
Ph:619/466/0622