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RECOMMENDED!






Review: The Publicity Handbook

by Wendy J. Woudstra - reviewer   

 
 


RATED:

Pros 
•  Great information, well presented, in every chapter
•  Checklists help you ensure you're not missing important items
•  Helpful examples of successful and unsuccessful PR, with detailed explanations.

Cons 
•  A little weak on Internet publicity.
•  A number of dead links among listed Internet resources.

There are a lot of great books available specifically about book publicity that will tell you who to send press releases to, and when in the publishing process you should begin promoting. But knowing when to contact the press without knowing exactly what journalists want and need to see is like buying construction plans without knowing how to use power tools.

This book will teach you exactly what you need to know to work effectively with journalists to maximize the effectiveness of your publicity efforts. You'll learn to use publicity tools - from press releases to public service announcements - to your best advantage.

Each section, from writing press releases to working with broadcasters, contains valuable checklists to help you organize your publicity efforts, and make them as effective and appealing to journalists as possible. The section on on-line publicity offers great advice on setting up an online press room, as well as dealing with journalists who write for online publications. This is all great information that will never go out of date.

The thirteenth chapter does contain references to many Web resources which may change over time, and many of them already have moved or shut down. Still, the vast majority of the information in this book will remain valuable for many years to come.

The Bottom Line -

If you plan to send press releases, or contact journalists about your titles, you need to read this book. Even if you're an old PR pro, you'll find this a useful reference you'll refer to again and again.


by Wendy Woudstra