Home    Contact   
Publishing Menubar Book PublishingMagazine PublishingAudiobook PublishingNewsletter PublishingE-Book PublishingeZine PublishingPublishing Menubar

Home
Associations
Authors
Awards
Book Binding
Book Fairs/Festivals
Book History
Canadian
Careers
Censorship
Children's Books
Contracts
Copyright
Design/Illustration
Distribution
Editorial
Education
Genres
Indexing
Libraries
Literary Agents
Marketing/Publicity
People/Profiles
Printing
Publishers
Reviews
Sales/Bookselling
Self-Publishing
Software
Statistics
Translation
Vendors/Services
Writing

RECOMMENDED!






Press Release Pointers

by Wendy J. Woudstra   

 
 


I have spent the better part of this last week working on writing and sending out press releases for three clients, so I've got envelope glue on my tongue, and publicity on my mind. Thus, we have the topic of the week: Tips for writing press releases.

I am not a professional publicist, and I don't get paid $200+ for each release I write, but I do think that I can whip up a pretty respectable press release the economical, do-it-yourself way. I've learned much since I started in this business, so I thought I'd share some tips with you.

1) One size does not fit all. You should have varying press releases for different markets. Most books can generate many different 'hooks,' the best being ones that coincide with current news or a hyped-up trend.

2) Remember your audience. When you write a release, you are writing for members of the media. Make the focus of the release of interest to them (and their audience, their readers), and more importantly, make the headline colorful and of interest to your audience. If you're sending out a news release, make it news-worthy!

3) This one seems obvious, but make sure your release is letter-perfect. A spelling error, a poorly produced photocopy, or a glaring omission will likely mean your release is fast tracked to the round file.

4) Quotes will get a better reception than hype. Make your press release sound more like a news article, and less like a sales letter. You'll find that the better you are at this, the better your odds are for getting your entire release, nearly verbatim, published in some form or other.

5) Finally, don't get discouraged if your release doesn't produce the desired results. If you happen to send your release the same day as a celebrity gets killed, kills someone, or commits a heinous crime, your news will undoubtedly not receive the attention it deserves. Don't call up the reporter or editor to complain, just deal with it, have a positive attitude, and try, try again. (Better yet, try to find a tie-in between the big story and your book!!)

One final note: I don't think it hurts (though I also can't prove that it helps) to send a thank-you note to the editor(s) who used your releases.


by Wendy Woudstra