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RECOMMENDED!






Creating A Long Term Relationship With Your Reader

by Lynne Klippel   

 
 


What do Wayne Dyer, JK Rowling, Stephen King, Nora Roberts and Mark Victor Hansen have in common?

They have a group of readers who love their work and eagerly buy each new book. They also have other things to offer delighted readers like movies, audio products, workshops, self-study courses, and retreats. In fact, JK Rowling just gave her blessings to a Harry Potter theme park in development in Florida.

These savvy authors know that writing a book is like having a first date. The key to creating success as an author is giving delighted readers many opportunities to learn from you and master the material in your book. In fact, these authors make the majority of their income not from book sales, but from the other products and services that are related to their books. The book is the beginning of a long-term relationship that profits both the readers and the authors.

If you are a non-fiction writer, you have many opportunities to create second dates with your readers. If you do, you will gain a loyal following, be seen as an expert in your niche, and create multiple revenue streams.

To accomplish this, first identify the main concepts in your book. Ask yourself:
• What ideas are the easiest to learn?
• Which ones are the most challenging, sophisticated, or require the most discipline?
• After reading my book, what skills or techniques would a reader need next?
• What questions do I receive most frequently on this material?

Then, think like a teacher. Consider the three learning styles- visual, auditory, and kinesthetic. Strive to create a way for people to get more information in all of these learning styles.

Next, create a product that appeals readers with various levels of independence. For example:
• Do-it-yourselfers enjoy workbooks, self-study programs or audio programs
• People who like some help respond well to membership sites, ecourses, teleclasses, or group coaching programs
• Those who want maximum levels of interaction with you like individual coaching or consulting, seminars, workshops, or retreats
• A few readers may want you to do things for them via an outsourcing or project management arrangement

Finally, think like a restaurant owner. Create a buffet or menu of products and services at varying price points that reinforce the material in your book.

By providing your readers with a variety of ways to learn more from you, they will come back for a second and third date with you. Some will from a long term relationship and purchase everything that you offer them.

Then, you will enjoy many rewards: the knowledge that you have a group of loyal readers who benefit from your work, and an enduring income stream from your book.

That's a long term relationship you can take to the bank!


Want to create a successful book? Discover 8 book marketing blunders that you can avoid. Grab your free ecourse at www.BookMarketingBlitz.com. Lynne Klippel is a publisher, author and book shepherd who specializes in helping authors write business building books.