Home    Contact   
Publishing Menubar Book PublishingMagazine PublishingAudiobook PublishingNewsletter PublishingE-Book PublishingeZine PublishingPublishing Menubar

Home
Associations
Authors
Awards
Book Binding
Book Fairs/Festivals
Book History
Canadian
Careers
Censorship
Children's Books
Contracts
Copyright
Design/Illustration
Distribution
Editorial
Education
Genres
Indexing
Libraries
Literary Agents
Marketing/Publicity
People/Profiles
Printing
Publishers
Reviews
Sales/Bookselling
Self-Publishing
Software
Statistics
Translation
Vendors/Services
Writing

Google
  Web PublishingCentral.com

The Art of Story Writing : CHAPTER XXII Rejected Manuscripts

by Nathaniel C. Fowler, JR   

CHAPTER XXII Rejected Manuscripts

FOR the reasons which I have given in another chapter, it is obvious that a large proportion of meritorious manuscripts will be rejected by one or several publishers. The author should send his manuscript to the publisher handling work of the class of his story. Many publishers are specialists, and publish but one class of matter. They will, therefore, reject a manuscript, no matter how meritorious, if it is out of their line.

Before sending a manuscript to a publisher, obtain his list of works, and ascertain whether or not he is publishing matter similar to your manuscript. If he is, then send him your manuscript. If he is not, apply to another publisher.

If the publisher returns the manuscript, do not consider that his refusal is prima facie evidence that it is not worthy of publication. Send it to another publisher, and continue to do so, until several, or even a dozen, publishers have rejected it. If possible, ascertain from each publisher, who turns your manuscript down, his reasons for doing so. If more than one reputable publisher, states that he has rejected it for the same or similar reasons, it will be well for you to consider rewriting or revising it.

If more than a dozen first-class publishers consider your manuscript unavailable, you may then feel that you have produced a manuscript which either contains little quality, or else would be of little or no interest to the reading public. Perhaps rewriting may remedy the faults, or it may be well for you to discard it altogether and write another, or quite likely continued refusal may indicate that you have not sufficient ability or experience to become an author. Do not become discouraged until several publishers have condemned your manuscript. What one editor considers worth while, another may reject. And many publishers have refused to publish a manuscript which, eventually, after it had found a publisher, brought fame and fortune to its author.

While rejection by even several publishers may not be considered sufficient evidence that the manuscript is unworthy of publication, rejection must not be taken as complimentary. The more publishers who reject your manuscript, the more likelihood there is that you have not produced a work of quality, or a seller.

Attempt to profit by each rejection. Rewrite and revise, if there is a consensus of opinion derogatory to your manuscript.

Many successful authors will tell you that they were able readily to sell rejected manuscripts after they had obtained a reputation. While this is very soothing to the author of a rejected manuscript, it must not be taken as evidence that the rejected manuscripts of famous authors should not have been turned down.

So long as books will continue to sell, not wholly by merit, but by the reputation of their authors, it is obvious that the publisher can profitably place upon the market a book by a popular author, which he would not publish if it were not for the author's reputation.