Home    Contact   
Publishing Menubar Book PublishingMagazine PublishingAudiobook PublishingNewsletter PublishingE-Book PublishingeZine PublishingPublishing Menubar

Home
Associations
Authors
Awards
Book Binding
Book Fairs/Festivals
Book History
Canadian
Careers
Censorship
Children's Books
Contracts
Copyright
Design/Illustration
Distribution
Editorial
Education
Genres
Indexing
Libraries
Literary Agents
Marketing/Publicity
People/Profiles
Printing
Publishers
Reviews
Sales/Bookselling
Self-Publishing
Software
Statistics
Translation
Vendors/Services
Writing

Google
  Web PublishingCentral.com

The Art of Story Writing : CHAPTER XXXII The Price of a Book

by Nathaniel C. Fowler, JR   

CHAPTER XXXII The Price of a Book

COMPARATIVELY few cloth-covered books retail for less than a dollar, the usual price for a novel, or work of fiction, being either a dollar, or a dollar and a quarter, or a dollar and a half, although a few books are listed at two dollars or even at three dollars.

The publisher, not the author, determines the price, and it may have much to do with the sale of the book.

It is obvious that, in most cases, more books will be sold at a dollar than at a higher price; therefore, ten per cent of one dollar may bring more to the author than he would receive if the book was priced at a dollar and a quarter or higher. Circumstances govern the price. Some books will sell as well at a dollar and a half as they would if listed at a dollar.

Children's stories are retailed at from twenty- five cents to a dollar, although a few of them are priced as high as a dollar and a half or two dollars, the latter figures applying only to books which are handsomely illustrated.

Art works and Be luxe editions may be marketed at any price, even as high as ten dollars for a single volume.

Text-books retail from seventy-five cents to two dollars, but the average price is about a dollar. Paper-covered books are sold at fifteen, twenty-five, or fifty cents. I do not recall any retailing for more than half a dollar.

The book publisher seldom receives the retail or list price of his product, as most of the books he publishes are sold to the bookstores, or to other publishers, at a trade discount of from twenty-five to forty per cent. The usual discount on a net book is twenty-five per cent., other books being subject to thirty-three and one-third per cent discount, and sometimes to forty per cent. This discount may not affect the author, who usually receives a royalty based upon the list or retail price. The reputable publisher does not sell any book at retail for less than the list price, but often the same book can be obtained at a department store at a discount of from ten to even fifty per cent.

The flush sale of the average novel is limited to a year or two from date of publication. The publisher, then, legitimately cuts the price to those who buy a large number of copies. The department store, because it is a large purchaser, may obtain a heavy additional discount, which enables it to market the book at trade price, or even lower, and yet make a reasonable profit.